AFA Officers


Carla Freeman
AFA President (15-17)
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Carla Freeman is Winship Distinguished Research Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and is associated faculty in Anthropology and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Emory University. Two primary puzzles lie at the heart of her scholarship and teaching: the relationship between theory and ethnographic particularity, and the dynamic relationships between gender, class, race, and culture. Freeman is the author of High Tech and High Heels in the Global Economy: Women, Work, and Pink Collar Identities in the Caribbean (Duke University Press, 2000),  Entrepreneurial Selves: Neoliberal Respectability and the Making of a Caribbean Middle Class (in press, Duke University Press 2014) and co-editor of Global Middle Classes: Ethnographic Particularities, Theoretical Convergences (SAR Press 2012, with Rachel Heiman and Mark Liechty), and articles on gender, globalization, labor, and identity in such journals as American Ethnologist, Signs: Journal of Women, Culture and Society, Feminist Studies, Critique of Anthropology, and Cultural Anthropology.  Freeman teaches courses on Feminist Ethnography and Anthropology, Globalization, and the Gender of Labor, and is the editor of a new Oxford University Press series of ethnographies, Issues of Globalization. Freeman’s general areas of research are: culture and political economy of globalization and development; feminist anthropology; affect and the changing nature of work/life; transnational migration, and her new research focuses on romantic love in the Caribbean.


Carla Jones
President-Elect (15-17)
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Carla Jones is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder.  Her research analyzes the cultural politics of appearance in urban Indonesia, with particular focus on femininity, manners, domesticity, aesthetics and Islam.  Throughout, she aims to bring feminist theory into conversation with both ethnography and anthropological questions about the political and the economic.  She has written extensively on self-improvement programs and middle-class respectability during the Suharto and post-Suharto periods in Yogyakarta and Jakarta, and is the co-editor, with Ann Marie Leshkowich and Sandra Niessen, of Re-Orienting Fashion: The Globalization of Asian Dress (Berg, 2003).  Her work has appeared in American Anthropologist, American Ethnologist, Fashion Theory, and the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies.  Her current work situates anxieties about Islamic style in the context of broader debates about visibility and corruption.  Jones earned her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 2001.  She teaches widely on globalization, Islam, and Southeast Asia.


Jennie Burnet
Treasurer (15-18)
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Jennie Burnet is Associate Professor of Global Studies and Anthropology in the Global Studies Institute at Georgia State University. Before joining Georgia State University, she was an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Louisville in Kentucky (USA). She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2005. Her work explores the social, cultural and psychological aspects of war, genocide, and mass violence and the micro-level impact of large-scale social change in the context of conflict. The majority of her research has focused on changing gender roles, the politics of memory, and local coping mechanisms in the aftermath of the 1994 genocide of Tutsis in Rwanda. She is currently conducting research on (1) organized resistance, rescuer behavior, and rescuers during in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda; (2) the long-term cultural, social, and psychological consequences of gender-based violence during conflict on women’s agency; and (3) women’s social movements and women’s roles in democratization, conflict resolution, and peace building. Her book,Genocide Lives in Us: Women, Memory & Silence in Rwanda, published in 2012 by the University of Wisconsin Press won the 2013 Elliot P. Skinner Award from the Association for Africanist Anthropology. Her research has appeared in Politics & Gender, African Affairs, and African Studies Review. She teaches courses in peace and conflict studies, development, refugee studies, ethnographic and qualitative research methods, and African politics and culture.


M. Gabriella Tores
Secretary (14-17)
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M. Gabriela Torres is a Guatemalan-born anthropologist that specializes in the study of the violence and state formation. Her work exploring the impact of violence on gender relations, nation-building and post-conflict reconstruction has been published in numerous journals and edited volumes including Anthropologica, the Anthropology of Work ReviewStudies in Social Justice, the Journal of Poverty and the Latin American Research Review. Her forthcoming co-edited book is entitled Marital Rape: Consent, Marriage and Social Change in Global Context. Gabriela Torres’ work as a scholar and leader has been recognized by the 2012 Wenner Gren Workshop Grant, the 2011 New England Council on Latin American Studies Best article prize, the 2009 AAA Leadership Fellowship, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. M. Gabriela Torres works as an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Wheaton College, MA. She is a teacher/scholar whose innovative work with technology in the teaching of anthropology has been featured through the National Institute for Technology and Liberal Education, the American Association of Colleges and Universities and Bryn Mawr’s Blended Learning in the Liberal Arts Conference.


Suyun Choi
Elected Member at Large – graduate student representative (15-18)
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Suyun Choi is a Ph.D student in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Emory. Her research is centered on women’s migration within Asia with the focus on migrant women’s lived experience of laboring, loving and living in transnational space. She is also interested in theoretical and political practices of Asian transnational feminism that calls into question categories of women and Asia represented in current discourses. As a graduate student representative of AFA, she would love to hear from fellow student members. Please join AFA’s Twitter and Facebook accounts, and send her a message to introduce yourself, share your ideas or ask questions.


Omotayo Jolaosho
Elected Member at Large (15-18)
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Bianca Williams
Elected Member at Large (15-18)
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Elise Andaya
Elected Member at Large (14-17)
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Elise Andaya is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University at Albany (SUNY). She specializes in gender and medical anthropology, and is particularly interested in the intersection between political-economy, policy, and reproduction. She has conducted fieldwork in Havana, Cuba, on shifts in reproduction, gender ideologies, and kinship strategies since the fall of the international socialist bloc, and is beginning a new project on reproduction and healthcare among female service sector workers in New York City. She is the author of Conceiving Cuba: Reproduction, Women, and the State in the Post-Soviet Era (2014) as well as several book chapters and articles in Medical Anthropology Quarterly and Feminist Studies


Erica Lorraine Williams
Elected Member at Large (14-17)
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Erica Lorraine Williams is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. She earned her Ph.D and M.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Stanford University, and her B.A. in Anthropology and Africana Studies from New York University. Erica’s research has focused on the cultural and sexual politics of the transnational tourism industry in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Her first book, Sex Tourism in Bahia: Ambiguous Entanglements, winner of the National Women’s Studies Association/University of Illinois Press First Book Prize, was published in November 2013. She has also published articles in Gender, Place, and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, Policing Pleasure: Global Reflections on Sex Work and Public Policy (Kelly and Dewey 2011);Taking Risks: Feminist Stories of Social Justice Research in the Americas (Shayne, ed. 2014), the Encyclopedia of Globalization (2012), and The Feminist Wire. She is currently embarking on a new research project on Afro-Brazilian feminist activism in northeastern Brazil. 


Joanna Davidson
Senior Program Co-Chair (15-16)
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Joanna Davidson is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Boston University. She is a cultural anthropologist whose research explores social and religious transformation, development theory and practice, cultural conceptions of knowledge, feminist and gender studies, and the politics and poetics of storytelling.  Her last project focused on responses to environmental and economic change among Diola rice cultivators in Guinea-Bissau, and her first book – Sacred Rice: Identity, Environment, and Development in Rural West Africa – will be coming out with Oxford University Press in 2015.  Joanna has published scholarly articles in range of journals including American EthnologistAfrican Studies Review, and Culture, Agriculture, Food & Environment.  Her research has been funded by various organizations including the Social Science Research Council, the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.  She has presented testimony and prepared policy briefings based on her research for the UN.  Joanna teaches classes on Africanist anthropology, ethnographic genres, anthropological critiques of development, and proposal writing.  Prior to graduate studies in anthropology, Joanna worked for several years with a range of progressive non-governmental international development organizations in Africa and Latin America on issues such as refugee resettlement, indigenous rights, women’s and rural development, and social entrepreneurship.


Caroline Yezer
Junior Program Co-Chair (15-16)
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Caroline Yezer is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA.  Her work focuses on indigenous rights, political violence, and transitional justice in Peru.  Her long-term fieldsite is in Peru’s Ayacucho department, an Andean region that was the epicenter of the country’s internal war, fought between the Peruvian state forces and the Maoist rebels known as The Shining Path.  Caroline has published on the politics of memory in Peru’s Truth Commission, the crisis of indigenous citizenship in Ayacucho, and the conflict between village governance, women’s rights and demilitarization.  Her coedited book Formas del Recuerdo: Etnografías de Ayacucho pasado y presente (Shapes of Memory: Ethnographies of Political Violence in Peru) was published by the Institute for Peruvian Studies in Lima in Fall of 2013.  Her latest research is on Peru’s drug war, including the suspension of civil rights in the drug emergency zone, and the parallel rise of indigenous politics, and coca grower movement in Ayacucho and Pichari, Cusco.  She is currently revising manuscripts on the recovery of village memories of the first wave of Shining Path guerrillas in rural Peruvian schools, and the effect of neoliberalism on Peru’s indigenous rights laws.  Her funding and awards include the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the Weatherhead Dissertation Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and the United States Institute of Peace.  


Emily De Wet
Anthropology News Contributing Editor
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Emily de Wet is a Ph.D. student at University of Notre Dame and Ph.D. Fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies (Notre Dame, IN). She received her B.A. at Wheaton College in Norton, MA. Her work explores the complexity of experience of racialized difference. Specifically, her research is centered on the ways that Black Townships in Cape Town, South Africa can be understood not solely through an economic and political lens of marginality, but as powerful zones of belonging that are constructed and created through the social and spatial experiences of township life.


Mounia El Kotni
Anthropology News Contributing Editor

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Mounia El Kotni is a PhD. candidate in Cultural and Medical Anthropology at the University at Albany, SUNY. Her research interests include women’s reproductive rights and indigenous rights in Mexico. Her dissertation research is based on thirteen months of ethnographic fieldwork in Chiapas, Mexico. Since 2013, she has been collaborating with the Organisation of Indigenous Doctors of Chiapas (OMIECH). In her dissertation, Mounia analyses the impact of Mexico’s public healthcare policies on indigenous midwives’ practices and women’s reproductive health in Chiapas.

Caroline Williams
AFA Website Co-Coordinator (14-16)
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Caroline Williams is an Associate Tutor at the University of East Anglia (UEA).  She received her PhD from the University of Arizona in 2013 from the American Indian Studies program, concentrating on Indigenous women and culture.  Her research explores the evolution of Indigenous beauty pageants from the boarding school era of the 19th century to the present day, exploring themes of resistance, agency, and cultural revitalization.


Beth Hallowell
AFA Website Co-Coordinator (15-17)
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Beth Hallowell is the Communications Research Director at the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) as well as a lecturer in the Departement of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. At AFSC, Beth leads a growing team that leverages social science research to improve AFSC’s communications. She also writes for AFSC’s messaging and media research blog, Media Uncovered. Her previous research explored the relationship between pregnancy-related emergencies, governance, and healthcare markets in the U.S. and Guatemala. Follow her on Twitter at @bethhallowell.


Tara Hefferan
AFA Book Review Editor (14-17)
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Tara Hefferan is Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan.  She is an applied cultural and medical anthropologist with research interests in reproductive health, social movements, international development, and faith-based organizations.  Currently, Hefferan is studying the political mobilizations of home birth midwives in Michigan around issues related to state licensure of midwives.  In her previous work, Hefferan looked at the deprofessionalization of international development work through a case study of partnerships linking Catholic parishes in Michigan and Haiti.  This research was published as the book Twinning Faith and Development: Catholic Parish Partnering in the US and Haiti.  Hefferan is also co-editor with Laurie Occhipinti and Julie Adkins of two volumes:  Bridging the Gaps: Neoliberalism, Faith-based Organizations and Development in Latin America and Not by Faith Alone: Social Services, Social Justice, and Faith-based Organizations


Judith Singleton
Voices Co-Editor (15-16) 
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Judith Singleton is a Professorial Lecturer of Anthropology at American University in Washington, D.C. She is a Cultural and Medical Anthropologist who holds a PhD in Anthropology and Certificates in Gender Studies; and African Studies from Northwestern University. Judith has conducted research in South Africa and the United States focusing on issues concerning gender, culture and health. Her dissertation research centered on sexual violence in South Africa in the form of acquaintance rape and various forms of sexual coercion experienced by poor women who lived in a community in the KwaZulu Natal province in the post-apartheid era. Since completing her Ph.D. in 2009, Judith has worked on several projects in Chicago including a long-term qualitative study on HIV in the African American community in Chicago and Seattle and a project examining the psychosocial effects of debt and stress among Chicago area adults. Her research has been published in African Studies Review, Voices and an edited volume scheduled for release in 2014 entitled Ekhaya: The Politics of Home in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. Judith teaches courses at the undergraduate level at American University including: Culture and The Human Experience and Roots of Racism.


Lavinia Nicolae
Voices Co-Editor (14-16)

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Lavinia Nicolae is Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Colgate University. She works in the areas of queer, feminist, and political anthropology concentrating on social movements, citizenship, and public policy in relation to LGBTQ identity and health. She is working on an ethnography based on her dissertation research concerning the production of social, legal, and political queer subjects through the same-sex marriage debate in New Mexico.  She is also engaging in new research that explores ways socialist and post-socialist surveillance practices, and European Union processes of legal reform, frame Romanian queer national and transnational identity and impact LGBTQ access to medical services in Romania.